brdgt: (Panda Rainbow by Iconomicon)
Monday morning links:

Moulage (French: casting/moulding) is the art of applying mock injuries for the purpose of training Emergency Response Teams and other medical and military personnel. Moulage may be as simple as applying pre-made rubber or latex "wounds" to a healthy "patient's" limbs, chest, head, etc., or as complex as using complicated makeup and theatre techniques to provide elements of realism (such as blood, vomitus, open fractures, etc.) to the training simulation. The practice dates to at least the Renaissance, when wax figures were utilized for this purpose. (wikipedia, link goes to blog entry on Moulage museum)


New Bakery in the hood, will have to swing by this week.


http://www.academichic.com, my new favorite blog.


Crispy Kale recipe - I had a version of these at the Green Owl with Emily last month and they were amazing.


Two songs I heard on XMU last week that I instantly fell in love with:

The Big Pink - Velvet from felix on Vimeo.



BROKEN BELLS, "THE HIGH ROAD" from EJ on Vimeo.

brdgt: (Anatomy by iconomicon)
Cancer Society, in Shift, Has Concerns on Screenings
By GINA KOLATA, The New York Times, October 21, 2009

The American Cancer Society, which has long been a staunch defender of most cancer screening, is now saying that the benefits of detecting many cancers, especially breast and prostate, have been overstated.

It is quietly working on a message, to put on its Web site early next year, to emphasize that screening for breast and prostate cancer and certain other cancers can come with a real risk of overtreating many small cancers while missing cancers that are deadly.

“We don’t want people to panic,” said Dr. Otis Brawley, chief medical officer of the cancer society. “But I’m admitting that American medicine has overpromised when it comes to screening. The advantages to screening have been exaggerated.”

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One of my grandmother's sister's was a Bridgettine Nun - a nursing order. She spent most of her life in the Philippines and Bangladesh as a nurse in the order's battered women shelters. She was in her 80s when she finally was forced to return to the States for surgery and lived the remainder of her life at the order's convent in upstate New York. This order sounds a lot like hers...

Months to Live: Sisters Face Death With Dignity and Reverence
By JANE GROSS, The New York Times, July 9, 2009

PITTSFORD, N.Y. — Gravely ill with heart disease, tethered to an oxygen tank, her feet swollen and her appetite gone, Sister Dorothy Quinn, 87, readied herself to die in the nursing wing of the Sisters of St. Joseph convent where she has been a member since she was a teenager.

She was surrounded by friends and colleagues of nearly seven decades. Some had been with her in college, others fellow teachers in Alabama at the time of the Selma march, more from her years as a home health aide and spiritual counselor to elderly shut-ins.

As she lay dying, Sister Dorothy declined most of her 23 medications not essential for her heart condition, prescribed by specialists but winnowed by a geriatrician who knows that elderly people are often overmedicated. She decided against a mammogram to learn the nature of a lump in her one remaining breast, understanding that she would not survive treatment.

There were goodbyes and decisions about giving away her quilting supplies and the jigsaw puzzle collection that inspired the patterns of her one-of-a-kind pieces. She consoled her biological sister, who pleaded with her to do whatever it took to stay alive.

Even as her prognosis gradually improved from hours to weeks and even months, Sister Dorothy’s goal was not immortality; it was getting back to quilting, as she has. She spread her latest on her bed: Autumnal sunflowers. “I’m not afraid of death,” she said. “Even when I was dying, I wasn’t afraid of it. You just get a feeling within yourself at a certain point. You know when to let it be.”

A convent is a world apart, unduplicable. But the Sisters of St. Joseph, a congregation in this Rochester suburb, animate many factors that studies say contribute to successful aging and a gentle death — none of which require this special setting. These include a large social network, intellectual stimulation, continued engagement in life and spiritual beliefs, as well as health care guided by the less-is-more principles of palliative and hospice care — trends that are moving from the fringes to the mainstream.

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Books of The Times: When Poets Were Scientists and Nature Their Mysterious Muse
By JANET MASLIN, The New York Times, July 9, 2009

(THE AGE OF WONDER: How the Romantic Generation Discovered the Beauty and Terror of Science, By Richard Holmes, Illustrated. 552 pages. Pantheon Books. $40.)

William Herschel, the German-born, star-gazing musician who effectively doubled the size of the solar system with a single discovery in 1781, was not regarded as a scientist. That word had not been coined during most of the era that will now be known, thanks to Richard Holmes’s amazingly ambitious, buoyant new fusion of history, art, science, philosophy and biography, as “The Age of Wonder.” And Mr. Holmes’s excitement at fusing long-familiar events and personages into something startlingly new is not unlike the exuberance of the age that animates his groundbreaking book.

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